Here’s our new Quadra 5 x-ray inspection unit

The new Nordson Dage Quadra 5 x-ray system inspection unit in our St Neots factory - left to right: operator giving a visual inspection of a PCB; putting it into the x-ray unit; checking the PCB via a high definition monitor. Objects can be magnified up to 45,000 times, enabling us to spot faults on components and connections as tiny as 0.35 μm.

We’ve just installed this Nordson Dage Quadra 5 x-ray system inspection unit in our St Neots factory. It’s in addition to our Dage unit, which has served us well for over 10 years.

The new Quadra* allows us to inspect obscured areas inside PCBs and components non-destructively – its high performance x-ray tube and detector can magnify objects up to 45,000 times, enabling us to spot faults on components and connections as tiny as 0.35 μm.

“This latest purchase is part of our on-going investment programme in plant, people and factory space,” said Derek Williams, General Manager at OSI Electronics UK.

“Given the complexity and number of components on many PCBs, ensuring they are secured and connected properly in vital.

“X-ray inspection allows us to check for solder shorts, open connections, paste residue, voiding, cracking, solder reflow and the many other facets involved with making boards which will work as intended time after time.

“It’s a testament to our ethos of constant investment in our business to provide quality products from PCB assembly to complete product build.”

The Quadra 5 can inspect boards up to 510 x 445 mm (20 x 17.5”). It shows detail in real time on a high definition monitor, allowing our trained operators to find any defects quickly.

OSI Electronics UK is a subsidiary of Californian based OSI Electronics.

Posted 22 May 2018; updated 19 September 2018,

* Quadra is a trademark of Nordson DAGE.

CAPTION
The new Nordson Dage Quadra 5 x-ray system inspection unit in our St Neots factory – left to right: operator giving a visual inspection of a PCB; putting it into the x-ray unit; checking the PCB via a high definition monitor. Objects can be magnified up to 45,000 times, enabling us to spot faults on components and connections as tiny as 0.35 μm.